Santorum Out; Menendez, Byrd to Keep Seats In Senate races, Democrat Bob Casey Jr. has defeated Sen. Rick Santorum in the hotly contested Pennsylvania race. And in New Jersey, where Republican Thomas Kean Jr. waged a fierce battle to unseat Democrat Robert Menendez, the incumbent is projected to keep his Senate seat.

Santorum Out; Menendez, Byrd to Keep Seats

Santorum Out; Menendez, Byrd to Keep Seats

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Former President Bill Clinton and Sen. Robert Menendez at a campaign rally. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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In Senate races, NPR is projecting that Democrat Bob Casey Jr. has defeated Sen. Rick Santorum in the hotly contested Pennsylvania race. And in New Jersey, where Republican Thomas Kean Jr. waged a fierce battle to unseat Democrat Robert Menendez, the incumbent is projected to keep his Senate seat.

Republicans Olympia Snowe and Richard Lugar are projected to keep their Senate seats, along with Democrats Bill Nelson of Florida, Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts and Robert Byrd in West Virginia. Bernie Sanders, an independent, will fill the Senate seat from Vermont.

Control of Congress is at stake in the midterm election, as well 36 governor's chairs and many thousands of state and local offices.

In northeastern Pennsylvania, three House seats were hotly contested. They are seen as bellwether races that could indicate a political shift in the United States.

NPR's John Ydstie is in Scranton, Pa., at the headquarters for Bob Casey Jr. Casey is competing against Sen. Rick Santorum, a Republican who has been behind for much of the race.

NPR's Adam Davidson is in Warwick, R.I., at the headquarters of Sen. Lincoln Chaffee. The Republican moderate is in a knock-down battle with Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse.

And NPR's Pam Fessler has been tracking voting issues today. So far, there haven't been indications of widespread problems. But in parts of Virginia and Ohio, polling places have been ordered to stay open later to accommodate voters who missed out on their chance to vote this morning.