For Iraq, U.S. Needs a 10-Year Plan -- At Least Retired Marine Col. Thomas Hammes says insurgencies last 10 to 30 years, and that the United States will need to maintain current troop levels in Iraq for the next three to four years. After that, he foresees a gradual drawdown over 10 years, with the U.S. maintaining at least 20,000 troops there.
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For Iraq, U.S. Needs a 10-Year Plan -- At Least

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For Iraq, U.S. Needs a 10-Year Plan -- At Least

For Iraq, U.S. Needs a 10-Year Plan — At Least

For Iraq, U.S. Needs a 10-Year Plan -- At Least

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6498360/6498361" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Melissa Block talks with retired Marine Col. Thomas Hammes, author of The Sling and the Stone: On War in the 21st Century.

Hammes, who has criticized Secretary Rumsfeld, says insurgencies tend to last from 10 to 30 years. He says the United States will need to maintain current troop levels in Iraq for the next three to four years. After that, he foresees a gradual drawdown over 10 years, with the U.S. maintaining at least 20,000 troops there.