Pakistan Shows Little Appetite for Pursuing Khan More than two years ago, Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan confessed and apologized for passing nuclear secrets to North Korea, Libya and Iran. And despite recent nuclear crises in Iran and North Korea, Pakistan says the Khan case is closed.
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Pakistan Shows Little Appetite for Pursuing Khan

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Pakistan Shows Little Appetite for Pursuing Khan

Pakistan Shows Little Appetite for Pursuing Khan

Pakistan Shows Little Appetite for Pursuing Khan

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6531094/6531095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than two years ago, Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan confessed and apologized for passing nuclear secrets to North Korea, Libya and Iran.

Since then, he has been under house arrest. A dozen of his aides were also detained, but they have all been released.

Pakistan says the Khan case is closed. And despite everything happening in Iran and North Korea, Pakistani security officials say Khan hasn't been questioned in months.