Motives Behind a Mantra: Revise, Revise, Revise Commentator Alain De Botton, who is a philosopher and author, analyzes why artists and writers keep revising their work over time.
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Motives Behind a Mantra: Revise, Revise, Revise

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Motives Behind a Mantra: Revise, Revise, Revise

Motives Behind a Mantra: Revise, Revise, Revise

Motives Behind a Mantra: Revise, Revise, Revise

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Commentator Alain De Botton, who is a philosopher and author, analyzes why artists and writers keep revising their work over time.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

But as commentator and philosopher Alain De Botton points out, that's not really a new idea.

ALAIN DE BOTTON: Though very few writers revise their work directly, a new book is always an attempt to atone for the faults of a previous one. Despite the merits of the occasional rewrite, perhaps the best way to revise any work of art may be just to move on and create something new.

NORRIS: Alain De Botton is a philosopher and the author of "The Architecture of Happiness."

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