YouTube's Amateur Video Revolution May Be Over In Sunday's San Jose Mercury News, Scott Kirsner argues that the homemade video revolution spurred by websites like YouTube may be over.
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YouTube's Amateur Video Revolution May Be Over

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YouTube's Amateur Video Revolution May Be Over

YouTube's Amateur Video Revolution May Be Over

YouTube's Amateur Video Revolution May Be Over

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Web sites like YouTube turned any wanna-be director with a video camera and an internet connection into a full-fledged broadcaster and has left most of main stream media struggling to keep up. But author Scott Kirsner argues in his op-ed in Sunday's San Jose Mercury News that the online video pendulum is swinging from quirky home videos back to professional grade quality.

Guest:

Scott Kirsner, Op-ed in Sunday's San Jose Mercury News; Edits the blog CinemaTech; Author of the book The Future of Web Video