Job Hunters Seek Winning Edge in Video Resumes Some job candidates hoping to stand out from the competition are posting video resumes online to boost their chances of getting hired. But federal employment officials say companies should handle video resumes with care.
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Job Hunters Seek Winning Edge in Video Resumes

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Job Hunters Seek Winning Edge in Video Resumes

Job Hunters Seek Winning Edge in Video Resumes

Job Hunters Seek Winning Edge in Video Resumes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6631326/6649545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trent Willis wants to work as a lobbyist on K Street. He grabbed recruiters' attention by creating a mock campaign-attack ad. hide caption

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Video Resumes: Our Picks

Here are six of our favorite video resumes from YouTube:

Aspiring director Manolo Celi has some fun with video-editing techniques in this video resume. hide caption

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Remember him? Aleksey Vayner sent an investment banking firm a video resume touting his seemingly superhuman skills -- as a student, weight lifter, martial-arts expert, dancer, skier and tennis player. He quickly became a laughing stock online and on TV. hide caption

Watch This Resume
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