Leading Newark, One of America's Deadly Cities Like the rest of the country, Newark, N.J., has seen an increase in violent crime. In fact, the city is on its way to setting a record for murders this year. Mayor Corey Booker, who took office in July, lived in a housing project in one of the city's grittiest neighborhoods.
NPR logo

Leading Newark, One of America's Deadly Cities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6648936/6648937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Leading Newark, One of America's Deadly Cities

Leading Newark, One of America's Deadly Cities

Leading Newark, One of America's Deadly Cities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6648936/6648937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Like the rest of the country, Newark, N.J., has seen an increase in violent crime. In fact, the city is on its way to setting a record for murders this year. Mayor Corey Booker, who took office in July, lived in a housing project in one of the city's grittiest neighborhoods.

Shortly after he was elected to the city council, Booker went on a 10-day hunger strike and moved into a tent in front of a notorious housing project to call attention to an open-air drug market. Then he quieted critics who dismissed the move as a publicty stunt by moving permanently into the Brick Towers -- a housing project in Newark's Central Ward.

Booker moved out recently, but only because he and a dozen other holdouts were evicted to make way for bulldozers.

Michele Norris talks with Booker about crime and his life in Brick Towers.

Related NPR Stories