The Ethics of Embryonic Sex-Selection Treatments As pre-implantation genetics diagnosis are used for embryo selection, Eric Cohen of the Ethics and Public Policy Center says that while it's understandable why parents would want to avoid giving birth to a child with a life threatening disease, it opens up questions about devaluing the lives of people with disabilities.
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The Ethics of Embryonic Sex-Selection Treatments

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The Ethics of Embryonic Sex-Selection Treatments

The Ethics of Embryonic Sex-Selection Treatments

The Ethics of Embryonic Sex-Selection Treatments

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6654622/6654623" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Michele Norris talks with Eric Cohen, director of the Biothics and American Democracy Program at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, about the ethics concerns over pre-implantation genetics diagnosis for embryo selection.

Cohen says that while it's understandable why parents would want to avoid giving birth to a child with a life threatening disease, it opens up questions about devaluing the lives of people with disabilities, and the temptation to use the technology to try and have only "perfect" children.