Judd Apatow: Favorite and Forgotten DVDs Judd Apatow, the man behind The Forty-Year-Old Virgin, shares five of his favorite DVDs and tells why it took so long to get the DVD released for his cult-hit TV show, Freaks and Geeks.
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Judd Apatow: Favorite and Forgotten DVDs

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Judd Apatow: Favorite and Forgotten DVDs

Judd Apatow: Favorite and Forgotten DVDs

Judd Apatow: Favorite and Forgotten DVDs

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6661387/6662332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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All news is bad news. Or so the saying goes. Many Brits firmly believe this — and use it as a branch to beat their journalists, one of the more despised species in these isles.

Writer and director Judd Apatow arrives at the premiere of his film, The 40-Year-Old Virgin. Getty Images hide caption

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Judd Apatow tells why it took so long to get his TV series Freaks and Geeks out on DVD.

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It is, of course, untrue. There's no better example of the media's appetite for good news than the tsunami of euphoria with which they've greeted Andy Murray's Wimbledon triumph on Sunday.

The English are feting Murray as a British hero. They're calling for him to be made a knight of the realm to honor his prowess with racquet and ball, and his status as the first British champion in men's singles at Wimbledon in 77 years.

Murray's actually from Scotland. Many Scots view him not only as their hero — not England's — but as the greatest Scottish sports star since they all wore kilts, and horned ginger-haired highland cattle were freely roaming their hills.

Why does this matter?

Because next year, Scots will vote on whether to stay in the United Kingdom. The possibility of Scottish secession is the subject of a fierce political contest between British Prime Minister David Cameron — who has vowed to fight tooth and nail to save the union — and Scotland's first minister, the nationalist Alex Salmond.

Salmond was at Sunday's championship match, sitting in the Royal Box, behind his adversary, Cameron.

When Murray won, Salmond craftily whipped out a big Scottish flag and joyously brandished it behind Cameron's head in full view of the cameras — and violating Wimbledon's house rules. We can expect to see that image many times in coming months, as the fight for Scottish independence gathers momentum.