N. Korea Nuclear Talks End with No Accord The latest negotiations aimed at ending North Korea's nuclear weapons program end in Beijing, producing no agreement, despite added urgency over North Korea's October nuclear test.
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N. Korea Nuclear Talks End with No Accord

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N. Korea Nuclear Talks End with No Accord

N. Korea Nuclear Talks End with No Accord

N. Korea Nuclear Talks End with No Accord

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The latest negotiations aimed at ending North Korea's nuclear weapons program end in Beijing, producing no agreement, despite added urgency over North Korea's October nuclear test.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports.

ANTHONY KUHN, Host:

Going into the talks, Korean negotiator Kim Kye Gwan had stated that his country would not abandon its nuclear weapons unless the U.S. ended its hostile policy towards North Korea and lifted its financial sanctions. Speaking at a press conference this afternoon, Kim made it clear that in five days of negotiations, he hadn't budged from that opening position.

KIM KYE GWAN: (Speaking in foreign language)

BLOCK: Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said he and the Chinese had seen encouraging signs earlier on that North Korea, or the DPRK, as it's formally known, was ready to discuss the details of nuclear disarmament.

CHRISTOPHER HILL: Hill said the nuclear negotiations would now go into recess for a matter of weeks - another 13-month hiatus like the one that preceded these talks, he said, wouldn't do.

BLOCK: Anthony Kuhn, NPR News, Beijing.

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