USGS Works to Advance Quake Warnings The U.S. Geological Survey will soon upgrade its rapid earthquake notifications to include a projection of hazard to human beings and potential economic losses. Emergency officials are rapidly notified when a large quake strikes anywhere in the world. But it can take hours or days to figure out whether a particular quake is a major threat to life and property.
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USGS Works to Advance Quake Warnings

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USGS Works to Advance Quake Warnings

USGS Works to Advance Quake Warnings

USGS Works to Advance Quake Warnings

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6682442/6682443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The U.S. Geological Survey will soon upgrade its rapid earthquake notifications to include a projection of hazard to human beings and potential economic losses. Emergency officials are rapidly notified when a large quake strikes anywhere in the world. But it can take hours or days to figure out whether a particular quake is a major threat to life and property.