Letters: Cincinnati Poverty, Peace, Christmas Songs Andrea Seabrook reads letters from listeners about poverty in Cincinnati, the nature of peace, and most- and least-favorite Christmas songs.
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Letters: Cincinnati Poverty, Peace, Christmas Songs

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Letters: Cincinnati Poverty, Peace, Christmas Songs

Letters: Cincinnati Poverty, Peace, Christmas Songs

Letters: Cincinnati Poverty, Peace, Christmas Songs

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  • Transcript

Andrea Seabrook reads letters from listeners about poverty in Cincinnati, the nature of peace, and most- and least-favorite Christmas songs.

ANDREA SEABROOK, Host:

Time now for your letters. The piece by Noah Adams on poverty in the neighborhood Over-the-Rhine in Cincinnati brought in this letter from Jason Bergett(ph) of Burlington, Vermont.

I: Kathleen Kennedy of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania thought Mr. Lacey hit the bullseye. He made repeated references to the connection between peace and social justice, Kennedy writes. The connection between peace and social justice was recently brought to the world's attention when with great insight the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to a micro-credit initiative, thus recognizing that poverty is not only an economic issue but also a peace issue.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHITE CHRISTMAS")

BING CROSBY: (Singing) I'm dreaming of a white Christmas...

SEABROOK: Write to us. Just go to our Web page, npr.org, and click on the link that says Contact Us.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "O HOLY NIGHT")

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