Forming a Bond With a Wild Box Turtle Commentator Julie Zickefoose has had a decade-long relationship with a wild box turtle, and the rare opportunity to forge a connection with it.
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Forming a Bond With a Wild Box Turtle

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Forming a Bond With a Wild Box Turtle

Forming a Bond With a Wild Box Turtle

Forming a Bond With a Wild Box Turtle

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Commentator Julie Zickefoose has had a decade-long relationship with a wild box turtle, and the rare opportunity to forge a connection with it.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

We might try to figure out why animals behave as they do. We might try and give up. But not commentator Julie Zickefoose. She thinks she has some idea of what's going on in the mind of one of her four footed neighbors.

JULIE ZICKEFOOSE: To me, he's more than a little box of instinct and reflex. He's my neighbor.

BLOCK: Artist and writer Julie Zickefoose keeps an eye out for box turtles and in the fall and she's always ready with a dish of fruit and worms. Her book of essays and illustrations is titled "Letters from Eden".

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