For Iraqi Expatriate, Divisions Come Hard Michele Norris talks with University of Maryland electrical engineering professor Shihab Shamma, an Iraqi expatriate whom we first spoke with at a Maryland polling station during Iraq's 2005 elections. Shamma grew up in Baghdad, and has relatives in Iraq. He says most people he talks to back home are sad but hopeful.
NPR logo

For Iraqi Expatriate, Divisions Come Hard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6712272/6712273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
For Iraqi Expatriate, Divisions Come Hard

For Iraqi Expatriate, Divisions Come Hard

For Iraqi Expatriate, Divisions Come Hard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6712272/6712273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michele Norris talks with University of Maryland electrical-engineering professor Shihab Shamma, an Iraqi expatriate whom we first spoke with at a Maryland polling station during Iraq's 2005 elections.

Shamma grew up in Baghdad, and has relatives in Iraq. He says most people he talks to back home are sad but hopeful.

Shamma is also bothered by the way the conflict has been couched in sectarian terms, and remembers that terms like Shiite and Sunni meant little in his childhood.