Exhibit Traces Black History Through Paper Dolls To most people, paper dolls are playthings from past generations. But for one woman, they're a window into the way African-Americans have been portrayed by popular culture. Writer and actress Arabella Grayson has been collecting black paper dolls for more than 10 years. Now, more than 100 of them are on display at the Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum in Washington, D.C.
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Exhibit Traces Black History Through Paper Dolls

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Exhibit Traces Black History Through Paper Dolls

Exhibit Traces Black History Through Paper Dolls

Exhibit Traces Black History Through Paper Dolls

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6723162/6723163" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Paper Dolls on Display

  Steven M. Cummings, Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum hide caption

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Steven M. Cummings, Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum

 

Steven M. Cummings, Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum

To most people, paper dolls are playthings from past generations. But for one woman, they're a window into the way African-Americans have been portrayed by popular culture.

Arabella Grayson, a writer and actress from Maryland, has been collecting black paper dolls for more than 10 years. Now, more than 100 of them are on display at the Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum in Washington, D.C. Grayson discusses her collection with Farai Chideya.