The Politics of Document Declassification On New Year's Day, millions of confidential documents were officially declassified. The move followed a decade-old deadline from former President Bill Clinton mandating that 25-year-old documents automatically be made public. The director of National Security Archives and an archivist at the National Archives discuss document declassification.
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The Politics of Document Declassification

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The Politics of Document Declassification

The Politics of Document Declassification

The Politics of Document Declassification

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On New Year's Day, millions of confidential documents were officially declassified. The move followed a decade-old deadline from former President Bill Clinton mandating that 25-year-old documents automatically be made public. The director of National Security Archives and an archivist at the National Archives discuss document declassification.

Guests:

Thomas Blanton, director of National Security Archives

Peter W. Klein, assistant professor at University of British Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism; wrote My Father's Red Scare in The New York Times

Michael Kurtz, assistant archivist for record services at the National Archives; responsible for declassification program in Washington, D.C.