Rocks Striking a Frozen Lake in Winter Listener Charles Skinner of Northfield, Minn., hurls rocks on the frozen lake near his home, creating a SoundClip that a caveman could have submitted — assuming he had our e-mail address.
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Rocks Striking a Frozen Lake in Winter

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Rocks Striking a Frozen Lake in Winter

Rocks Striking a Frozen Lake in Winter

Rocks Striking a Frozen Lake in Winter

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Listener Charles Skinner of Northfield, Minn., hurls rocks on the frozen lake near his home, creating a SoundClip that a caveman could have submitted — assuming he had our e-mail address.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From the land of traditionally chilly winters, listener Charles Skinner of Northfield, Minnesota, sends us today's sound clip. It's in a form of an audio puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF ROCKS THROWN ON A FROZEN LAKE)

CHARLES SKINNER: Any guesses anyone? It's a natural sound that a caveman could've made.

Anyone who lives near a lake knows what the sound is, at least if you live in Minnesota.

Rocks? Skipping, sliding, bouncing across the ice.

(SOUNDBITE OF ROCKS THROWN ON A FROZEN LAKE)

(SOUNDBITE OF ROCKS THROWN ON A FROZEN LAKE)

SKINNER: That sound is one of the joys of my life. And as the ice gets thicker, the sound gets deeper, until eventually, because of the ice expanding - especially at night, it sings on its own. Sounds like a whale as the ice gets thinker and thicker and thicker. In your skating, watch for sounds that are too high, kind of a tinkley sound, because that means you're about to through the eyes. But as it gets thicker, it will hold in a person of two inches, a car of 6 inches, and by the middle of winter, my next-door neighbor who's a Northwest Airlines says it's thick enough to land a commercial airliner on.

(SOUNDBITE OF ROCKS THROWN ON A FROZEN LAKE)

NORRIS: That's the sound of rocks thrown on the ice of a frozen Minnesota lake, a sound clip from listener Charles Skinner. You can find out how to submit your own sound by going to npr.org.

SIEGEL: I'm Robert Siegel.

NORRIS: And I'm Michele Norris. You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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