Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including Rep. George Miller (D-CA); Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH); Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA); President George W. Bush; Sen. Chuck Hagel (R-NE); Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA); Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC); Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice.
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including Rep. George Miller (D-CA); Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH); Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA); President George W. Bush; Sen. Chuck Hagel (R-NE); Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA); Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC); Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice.

JOHN YDSTIE, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm John Ydstie. And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Representative GEORGE MILLER (Democrat, California): After going to work everyday, every week, every month, they ended up poor - far below the poverty line of this country. They have been working at a federal poverty wage, not a federal minimum wage.

Representative STEVE CHABOT (Republican, Ohio): This bill increases costs for mom and pop businesses. The Congressional Budget Office, CBO, estimates it to be five to seven billion dollars without providing them with the opportunity to grow their business and thus create more jobs.

House Speaker NANCY PELOSI (Democrat, California): The yeas are 315. The nays are 116. The bill is passed!

President GEORGE W. BUSH: So America will change our strategy to help the Iraqis carry out their campaign to put down sectarian violence and bring security to the people of Baghdad. This will require increasing American force levels, so I've committed more than 20,000 additional American troops to Iraq.

Senator CHUCK HAGEL (Republican, Nebraska): This speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since Vietnam, if it's carried out.

Senator TED KENNEDY (Democrat, Massachusetts): An escalation, whether it is called a surge or any other name, is still an escalation. And I believe it would be an immense new mistake. It would compound the original misguided decision to invade Iraq.

Senator LINDSEY GRAHAM (Republican, South Carolina): And to my colleagues, I would ask - at least in the short term here - that we measure our words, that we not have a political stampede to declare the war a loss when it's not yet lost.

Mr. ROBERT GATES (Secretary of Defense): I don't think anybody has a definite idea about how long the surge would last. I think for most of us, in our minds we're thinking of it as a matter of months, not 18 months or two years.

General PETER PACE (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff): From a military standpoint, no need to cross the Iranian border. We can track down, and are tracking down, and have added resources to going after the networks in Iraq regardless of where they're coming from. It is instructive that in the last couple of weeks we found Iranians twice.

Ms. CONDOLEEZZA RICE (Secretary of State): This is not a change in what we are trying to achieve. The Iraqi government needs to establish population security. What this augmentation does is to help them carry out their plan to get population security.

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