Idaho Governor on the Warpath with Gray Wolf Idaho rancher-turned-governor "Butch" Otter has opposed having wolves in the state since the federal government started talking about reintroducing them 15 years ago. Now the government is about to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list in the Northern Rockies, and Otter says he'll be the first in line for a tag to shoot one.
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Idaho Governor on the Warpath with Gray Wolf

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Idaho Governor on the Warpath with Gray Wolf

Idaho Governor on the Warpath with Gray Wolf

Idaho Governor on the Warpath with Gray Wolf

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Idaho rancher-turned-politician "Butch" Otter, has opposed having wolves in the state since the federal government started talking about reintroducing them 15 years ago. Now Otter is Idaho's new governor, and the federal government is on the verge of taking the gray wolf off the endangered species list in the Northern Rockies.

Otter says he's looking forward to that day. In fact, he told a crowd of sportsmen that he's planning to bid for the first ticket to shoot a wolf. And he advocates using hunting to cut the number of wolf packs in the state from 70 to 10.