Ah, the Joys of Sushi — and the Green Monster A proposal at Boston's Fenway Park could have Red Sox fans eating sushi during baseball games this season. Red Sox officials say the idea came about because fans want healthier fare at the ball park — and because of the debut of Japanese pitching sensation Daisuke Matsuzaka. We imagine what it would be like if it becomes a reality.
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Ah, the Joys of Sushi — and the Green Monster

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Ah, the Joys of Sushi — and the Green Monster

Ah, the Joys of Sushi — and the Green Monster

Ah, the Joys of Sushi — and the Green Monster

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A proposal at Boston's Fenway Park could have Red Sox fans eating sushi during baseball games this season. Red Sox officials say the idea came about because fans want healthier fare at the ball park — and because of the debut of Japanese pitching sensation Daisuke Matsuzaka. We imagine what it would be like if it becomes a reality.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

We have one last sports item to end this hour. Red Sox fans, it could be time to say Sayonara to Fenway franks and Konnichiwa to Fenway sushi. The folks at Fenway Park say they are considering adding sushi to the menu this season, just in time for the Boston debut of Japanese pitching sensation Daisuke Matsuzaka.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

This would certainly not be the first time you'd be able to buy sushi at a ballpark. At some California stadiums, you might have an easier time getting a salmon avocado roll than a hotdog. But in Boston, it would be a first. John Blake is a spokesman for Fenway, and he says there are two reasons they are considering offering sushi.

Mr. JOHN BLAKE (Spokesman, Fenway Park): One, it's a healthy dietary menu. And I think it was ballparks' look to kind of go with that trend and provide more healthy food. But obviously, two, there's the whole issue of the increase in interest from Japan and everything with the signing of Daisuke Matsuzaka.

BLOCK: Well, this sushi thing is just a proposal, but we can't help imagining what a day at Fenway would be like with a little pickled ginger.

Unidentified Man: Tekka maki, unagi, sea urchin here, get your spicy tuna rolls here.

Unidentified Man #2: Hey, can I get a California roll?

Unidentified Man: What are you, rooting for the Dodgers? Toro, toro, toro, get it here.

Unidentified Woman: Can I have some more soy sauce?

Unidentified Man: Yeah. Here you go.

Unidentified Man #3: Hey you got soy sauce all over my footlong.

Unidentified Man: Hey you want wasabi with that? Get your sashimi. Today's special, the green monster. More wasabi than you can take, guaranteed.

Unidentified Woman #2: This spider roll is disgusting.

Unidentified Man: Listen, lady, what do I look like, Benihana? Get your ice-cold sake here. Ten-shot limit by order of the state troopers.

NORRIS: Buy me some peanuts and Crackerjacks, please.

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