Letter Bombs Rattle London Motor-Vehicle Offices An enraged motorist may be waging a letter-bomb campaign against traffic enforcement agencies. Three bombs exploded at auto agencies this week. Police say the devices appear to have been intended to shock, not kill.
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Letter Bombs Rattle London Motor-Vehicle Offices

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Letter Bombs Rattle London Motor-Vehicle Offices

Letter Bombs Rattle London Motor-Vehicle Offices

Letter Bombs Rattle London Motor-Vehicle Offices

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7260574/7260575" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An enraged motorist may be waging a letter-bomb campaign against traffic enforcement agencies. Three bombs exploded at auto agencies this week. Police say the devices appear to have been intended to shock, not kill.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Striking workers at Harley Davidson's largest factory ended talks with management yesterday without agreement. Nearly 2,800 union employees at the motorcycle maker's plant in York, Pennsylvania walked out last Friday. You would think given the choice they would ride out. But anyway, they're angry about proposed contract concessions, including a demand that they pay more of their health insurance.

The company says it's trying to avert a cost crunch, adding that if the strike continues, it will be forced to cut production and lay off workers in other factories.

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