Gates Takes a New Look at 'Uncle Tom' In the 1950s, Uncle Tom's Cabin went from being a literary phenomenon to an object of scorn, with its title character symbolizing black self-loathing. Henry Louis Gates has re-examined the book in a new annotated edition.
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Gates Takes a New Look at 'Uncle Tom'

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Gates Takes a New Look at 'Uncle Tom'

Gates Takes a New Look at 'Uncle Tom'

Gates Takes a New Look at 'Uncle Tom'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7488550/7488557" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Cover of 'The Annotated Uncle Tom's Cabin'

In the 1950s, Uncle Tom's Cabin went from being a literary phenomenon to an object of scorn, with its title character symbolizing black self-loathing. Henry Louis Gates has re-examined the book in a new annotated edition.

Guest:

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., chair, African and African-American Studies Department at Harvard

Hollis Robbins, assisted on notes on The Annotated Uncle Tom's Cabin; member of the faculty at the Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins

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