The Sounds of Elevators Falling Down With another entry in our SoundClips series, Philadelphia elevator inspector Jim Boxmeyer watches and listens to an elevator in free-fall.
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The Sounds of Elevators Falling Down

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The Sounds of Elevators Falling Down

The Sounds of Elevators Falling Down

The Sounds of Elevators Falling Down

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  • Transcript

With another entry in our SoundClips series, Philadelphia elevator inspector Jim Boxmeyer watches and listens to an elevator in free-fall.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Today's SoundClip comes from a man who spends quite a bit of his time in elevators, and he's very familiar with their safety equipment.

Mr. JIM BOXMEYER (Elevator Inspector): My name is Jim Boxmeyer. I'm an elevator inspector in the state of Pennsylvania. And what you're going to be hearing is the test of a safety device on an elevator in a high-rise building. The test that we're performing and I'm witnessing as an inspector involves placing weights, steel weights, large steel weights equal to the capacity of the elevator - about 3,500 pounds - on the car and then over-speeding the elevator, at which point a safety device grips the rails and brings the car to a safe stop.

(Soundbite of falling elevator, crash)

Mr. BOXMEYER: I've always loved elevators. I was in the business for about 25 years. I just like to look at elevators and watch them run and see the cables and look at the controls. And it's just amazing, this collection of equipment that's evolved over 150 years to the state-of-art elevators we have today.

(Soundbite of falling elevator, crash)

Mr. BOXMEYER: During this test, no people ever ride on the elevator - just the weights.

BLOCK: That's Philadelphia elevator inspector Jim Boxmeyer, watching and listening to elevators in free-fall. If there's a sound you listen for at work or anywhere else, we'd like to hear about it. Go to npr.org and search for SoundClips.

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