Is It the Universal Joint? Two people were driving through Minnesota when they started having car trouble. They pulled into a Midas shop. A mechanic had a look. And he suspected that the trouble might have to do with the 150 pounds of marijuana hidden in the gas tank. The mechanic called police, who say the tank had a secret pot compartment. And the hidden cargo apparently got mixed in with the gasoline. Think of it as "biofuel."
NPR logo

Is It the Universal Joint?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7513898/7513899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Is It the Universal Joint?

Is It the Universal Joint?

Is It the Universal Joint?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7513898/7513899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two people were driving through Minnesota when they started having car trouble. They pulled into a Midas shop. A mechanic had a look. And he suspected that the trouble might have to do with the 150 pounds of marijuana hidden in the gas tank. The mechanic called police, who say the tank had a secret pot compartment. And the hidden cargo apparently got mixed in with the gasoline. Think of it as "biofuel."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Two people were driving through Minnesota when they started having car trouble. They pulled into a Midas shop. A mechanic had a look. And he suspected that the trouble might have to do with the 150 pounds of marijuana hidden in the gas tank. The mechanic called police, who say the tank had a secret pot compartment. The hidden cargo apparently got mixed in with the gasoline. You could think of this as biofuel.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.