Desert Trek a Cartoonish Test of Endurance Some might think of it as torture fit only for Bugs Bunny. In a reprise of the "Sahara Hare" cartoon, three ultra-endurance athletes ran 4,000 miles across the Sahara Desert. It was the equivalent of two marathons a day for 111 days through six African countries. The run ended Tuesday in Egypt — and yes, it will be made into a movie.
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Desert Trek a Cartoonish Test of Endurance

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Desert Trek a Cartoonish Test of Endurance

Desert Trek a Cartoonish Test of Endurance

Desert Trek a Cartoonish Test of Endurance

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Some might think of it as torture fit only for Bugs Bunny. In a reprise of the "Sahara Hare" cartoon, three ultra-endurance athletes ran 4,000 miles across the Sahara Desert. It was the equivalent of two marathons a day for 111 days through six African countries. The run ended Tuesday in Egypt — and yes, it will be made into a movie.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Three ultra-endurance athletes accomplished what many may think of as torture fit only for Bugs Bunny. In a reprise of the famous rabbit's "Sahara Hare" cartoon, the three athletes ran 4,000 miles across the Sahara Desert. It was the equivalent of two marathons a day for 111 days through six African countries. The run ended yesterday in Egypt and yes, it will be a movie - a documentary.

This is MORNING EDITION.

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