Voices in the News A montage of voices in the past week's news, including: Dave Neeleman, founder and CEO of JetBlue; Kate Hanni, founder, Coalition for an Airline Passenger's Bill of Rights; British Prime Minister Tony Blair; Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; President Bush; Col. Douglas McGregor, (Army, ret.); Gen. George W. Casey; Secretary Rice, again; Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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A montage of voices in the past week's news, including: Dave Neeleman, founder and CEO of JetBlue; Kate Hanni, founder, Coalition for an Airline Passenger's Bill of Rights; British Prime Minister Tony Blair; Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; President Bush; Col. Douglas McGregor, (Army, ret.); Gen. George W. Casey; Secretary Rice, again; Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen. And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. DAVE NEELEMAN (Founder and CEO, JetBlue): We just want to do the right thing by our customers. And we failed them and we failed our crew members. And, you know, I wanted to create something in writing that we would have a laser beam focus on.

Ms. KATE HANNI (Coalition for an Airline Passengers Bill of Rights): It sounds good from the outset, but the airlines haven't been honest in the past about hanging on to their commitments.

Prime Minister TONY BLAIR (Great Britain): The actual reduction of forces will be from the present 7,100 itself down from over 9,000 two years ago, and 40,000 at the time of the conflict to roughly 5,5000.

Ms. CONDOLEEZZA RICE (Secretary of State): The British have done what is really the plan for the country as a whole, which is to be able to transfer security responsibilities to the Iraqis, as conditions permit.

Mr. ROBERT GATES (Secretary of Defense): Like many Americans, I was dismayed to learn this past week that some of our injured troops were not getting the best possible treatment at all stages of their recovery; in particular, the outpatient care. This is unacceptable and it will not continue.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: Many of our soldiers have returned from war with grave wounds that they will carry with them the rest of their lives, and America will fulfill its duty by providing them the best medical care possible.

Colonel DOUGLAS MCGREGOR (U.S. Army, Retired): The generals seem to be falling all over themselves, anxious to mollify people and declare mea culpa. Whereas, there's been a complete unwillingness to admit to the multitude of errors on the ground in Iraq and also in Afghanistan that have produced the current conditions, which are nothing short of disastrous.

General GEORGE W. CASEY (United States Army): What we're seeing so far, including these recent statements, is just more of the same defiance. It's clear that Iran is not moving in the right direction, and I think that's unfortunate.

Ms. RICE: The best course would be for Iran to suspend its enrichment and reprocessing activities so that we can return to negotiations. That is the entire purpose of having the pressure on the Iranian regime, is so that the Iranian regime can make better choices about how to engage the international community.

Prime Minister EHUD OLMERT (Israel): The Iranians are not close to the technological threshold as they claim to be. And unfortunately they are as far as we would love them to be.

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