Tornado Gave Alabama School Officials Hard Choice Tornadoes took at least 20 lives across the South Thursday, including eight at a high school in Enterprise, Ala. Officials decided not to send students home by bus. Then the school took a direct hit and the roof collapsed.
NPR logo

Tornado Gave Alabama School Officials Hard Choice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7681850/7681851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tornado Gave Alabama School Officials Hard Choice

Tornado Gave Alabama School Officials Hard Choice

Tornado Gave Alabama School Officials Hard Choice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7681850/7681851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

On the same day that President Bush was visiting New Orleans, people across much of this country were dealing with smaller natural disasters. Americans have been dodging tornadoes from Kansas to Missouri to Georgia. And sunrise this morning gives people in the Southeast a chance to look at the latest damage. The greatest number of deaths from tornadoes reported so far came in Georgia, where nine people were killed. And in Enterprise, Alabama a tornado struck a school. It tore off the roof and left five people killed by falling debris.

Tanya Ott, from member station WBHM, reports from Enterprise.

TANYA OTT: Throughout the day, anxious parents packed nearby City Hall, hoping to hear word of their children's fate. The twister tore through Enterprise High School around one yesterday afternoon.

Coffee County Emergency Manager John Tallis(ph).