Man Supports Troops with Firecracker Stunt A Michigan man strapped more than 13,000 firecrackers onto himself, and lit the fuse. John Fletcher publicized it as an effort to support U.S. troops. It was an event to collect cell phones for soldiers. The Daily Press and Argus, in Livingston County, Mich., shows Fletcher standing calmly as the firecrackers explode. Afterward he did say he needed some Tylenol.
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Man Supports Troops with Firecracker Stunt

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Man Supports Troops with Firecracker Stunt

Man Supports Troops with Firecracker Stunt

Man Supports Troops with Firecracker Stunt

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A Michigan man strapped more than 13,000 firecrackers onto himself, and lit the fuse. John Fletcher publicized it as an effort to support U.S. troops. It was an event to collect cell phones for soldiers. The Daily Press and Argus, in Livingston County, Mich., shows Fletcher standing calmly as the firecrackers explode. Afterward he did say he needed some Tylenol.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

You're hearing the Michigan man who strapped more than 13,000 firecrackers onto himself and lit the fuse. John Fletcher publicized it as an effort to support U.S. troops. It was an effort to collect cell phones for soldiers. The Daily Press & Argus in Livingston County, Michigan shows him standing calmly as the firecrackers explode. Afterward, he did say that he needed some Tylenol.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE CHEERING AND FIRECRACKERS)

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION.

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