Viacom Sues Google, YouTube Viacom is suing Google for $1 billion, alleging copyright infringement. Google's subsidiary, YouTube, allows people to post video on the Internet. Viacom alleges that YouTube is playing more than 160,000 unauthorized video clips.
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Viacom Sues Google, YouTube

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Viacom Sues Google, YouTube

Viacom Sues Google, YouTube

Viacom Sues Google, YouTube

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7872673/7872674" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Viacom is suing Google for $1 billion, alleging copyright infringement. Google's subsidiary, YouTube, allows people to post video on the Internet. Viacom alleges that YouTube is playing more than 160,000 unauthorized video clips.

ALEX CHADWICK, host:

This is DAY TO DAY from NPR News. I'm Alex Chadwick.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

I'm Madeleine Brand.

CHADWICK: Madeleine, I know you're going to be happy to hear this. More news out today that gives me a chance to talk a little bit more about the future of television.

BRAND: Oh, Alex, I'm thrilled. You talked about the five best ideas in TV all last week. And, what, you have another one?

CHADWICK: Well, not exactly, just more news. It is this: Viacom is suing Google for $1 billion for copyright infringement. Viacom owns MTV and Google owns YouTube.

BRAND: One billion, with a B?

CHADWICK: Yeah.

BRAND: What is Viacom claiming Google did?

CHADWICK: Well, it's saying that YouTube is playing more than 160,000 unauthorized video clips from Viacom's cable networks - and this is something we mentioned in our TV series that might be a problem for Google, which is trying to figure out how to make a business of YouTube - this is copyright infringement.

BRAND: So what will happen if they have to remove all their clips?

CHADWICK: Well, you know, maybe it will make YouTube a less attractive place, because these clips turned out to be very, very popular among viewers or more likely YouTube and Google will, at some point, work out a deal with Viacom because getting more people to watch this stuff really is in everybody's interest.

BRAND: All right, Alex, well, thank you for that update.

CHADWICK: Madeleine, you're welcome.

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