Iraq - Nerve Gas Antidote U.S. officials say Iraq has ordered unusually large quantities of the drug atropine, which can be used as an antidote to nerve gas. This suggests that Saddam Hussein is planning to use chemical weapons in any conflict with the United States and wants the atropine to protect his own troops. American military planners have already concluded that Iraq will use chemical and/or biological weapons if there is a war. The atropine order was placed with a Turkish company. The United States has asked Turkey to stop the sale. NPR's Tom Gjelten reports from Washington.
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Iraq - Nerve Gas Antidote

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Iraq - Nerve Gas Antidote

Iraq - Nerve Gas Antidote

Iraq - Nerve Gas Antidote

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U.S. officials say Iraq has ordered unusually large quantities of the drug atropine, which can be used as an antidote to nerve gas. This suggests that Saddam Hussein is planning to use chemical weapons in any conflict with the United States and wants the atropine to protect his own troops. American military planners have already concluded that Iraq will use chemical and/or biological weapons if there is a war. The atropine order was placed with a Turkish company. The United States has asked Turkey to stop the sale. NPR's Tom Gjelten reports from Washington.

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