Dog Smarts The ties that bind dogs and humans go back thousands of years, and now a researcher has figured out that it probably began in Southeast Asia, where he thinks modern dogs evolved from a relatively gentle breed of wolves. NPR's Richard Harris reports on two new studies that explore the relationship between humans and "man's best friend."
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Dog Smarts

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Dog Smarts

Dog Smarts

Dog Smarts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/851977/851978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The ties that bind dogs and humans go back thousands of years, and now a researcher has figured out that it probably began in Southeast Asia, where he thinks modern dogs evolved from a relatively gentle breed of wolves. NPR's Richard Harris reports on two new studies that explore the relationship between humans and "man's best friend."