Scientists Find Evidence of First Writing in New World Archaeologists believe they may have identified the first people in the Western Hemisphere who knew how to write. The Olmec people, who lived in what is now southern Mexico, left behind the carving of a single bird that researchers say may be a clue to an entire language. NPR's Eric Niiler reports.
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Scientists Find Evidence of First Writing in New World

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Scientists Find Evidence of First Writing in New World

Scientists Find Evidence of First Writing in New World

Scientists Find Evidence of First Writing in New World

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/872321/872322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Archaeologists believe they may have identified the first people in the Western Hemisphere who knew how to write. The Olmec people, who lived in what is now southern Mexico, left behind the carving of a single bird that researchers say may be a clue to an entire language. NPR's Eric Niiler reports.