Al-Qaida Insurgents Retain Grip on Mosul The Iraqi city of Mosul is one of the last remaining strongholds for Al-Qaida in Iraq. Mosul was once considered one of the brightest spots in the country. But over the weekend, a U.S. military spokesman said that "between half and two-thirds" of all attacks across Iraq each day come from Mosul.
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Al-Qaida Insurgents Retain Grip on Mosul

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Al-Qaida Insurgents Retain Grip on Mosul

Al-Qaida Insurgents Retain Grip on Mosul

Al-Qaida Insurgents Retain Grip on Mosul

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The Iraqi city of Mosul is one of the last remaining strongholds for Al-Qaida in Iraq. Mosul was once considered one of the brightest spots in the country. But over the weekend, a U.S. military spokesman said that "between half and two-thirds" of all attacks across Iraq each day come from Mosul.

STEVEN INSKEEP, host:

Insurgents remain active in large parts of Mosul. That city was once considered one of the brightest spots in Iraq. But over the weekend, a U.S. military spokesman said that of all attacks across Iraq each day, between half and two-thirds come from Mosul.

Last week, a U.S. military helicopter was in the sky over Mosul. The Americans believed they'd found a man responsible for some of the attacks. And at the appropriate moment, the American helicopter fired a missile. It struck and killed a man named Abu Yasir al-Saudi and another man. Al-Saudi is said to have masterminded an attack in the city that killed five U.S. soldiers in January.

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