Criminal Charges Filed in Toxic Toothpaste Case Criminal charges have been filed against four men involved in importing and distributing toothpaste that contained a toxic substance. Prosecutors say the toothpaste was distributed in the U.S. from December 2005 until May 2007. It contained a chemical commonly used in antifreeze.
NPR logo

Criminal Charges Filed in Toxic Toothpaste Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/87974953/87974921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Criminal Charges Filed in Toxic Toothpaste Case

Criminal Charges Filed in Toxic Toothpaste Case

Criminal Charges Filed in Toxic Toothpaste Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/87974953/87974921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Criminal charges have been filed against four men involved in importing and distributing toothpaste that contained a toxic substance. Prosecutors say the toothpaste was distributed in the U.S. from December 2005 until May 2007. It contained a chemical commonly used in antifreeze.

STEVEN INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with toxic toothpaste and criminal charges.

The criminal charges have been filed against four men involved in importing and distributing toothpaste that contained a toxic substance. Prosecutors say the toothpaste was distributed in the United States from December 2005 until May 2007 and ended up in prisons and some hotels.

It contained a chemical commonly used in antifreeze and it can cause kidney and liver damage. The manufacturer in China had used it as a cheaper replacement for the usual toothpaste thickener, and the scandal added to fears about Chinese imports.

Also yesterday, the Senate approved a bill that would toughen consumer product safety laws.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.