Saudi Cleric: Dancing Days Are Here Again A cleric in Saudi Arabia thinks religious fundamentalists have finally gone far enough. He's an adviser to the Ministry of Justice and a video on the Internet showed him dancing at a wedding. That angered religious hardliners, who follow a version of Sunni Islam that disapproves of singing and dancing. In a newspaper interview, the official urged his critics to "get over restrictions imposed by ignorant people."
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Saudi Cleric: Dancing Days Are Here Again

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Saudi Cleric: Dancing Days Are Here Again

Saudi Cleric: Dancing Days Are Here Again

Saudi Cleric: Dancing Days Are Here Again

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A cleric in Saudi Arabia thinks religious fundamentalists have finally gone far enough. He's an adviser to the Ministry of Justice and a video on the Internet showed him dancing at a wedding. That angered religious hardliners, who follow a version of Sunni Islam that disapproves of singing and dancing. In a newspaper interview, the official urged his critics to "get over restrictions imposed by ignorant people."

STEVEN INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A cleric in Saudi Arabia thinks religious fundamentalists have finally gone far enough. He's an advisor to the Ministry of Justice, and a video on the Internet showed him dancing at a wedding. That angered religious hardliners who follow a version of Sunni Islam that disapproves of singing and dancing. In a newspaper interview, the official has responded, urging his critics to, quote, "get over restrictions imposed by ignorant people."

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