Public Sticks with 'Forever' Stamps It's may now be viewed as snail mail, but the U.S. Postal Service has managed to hit on a winning strategy for selling stamps: Announce an increase in price, then offer a "Forever Stamp" that never goes up. Since its introduction last year, Americans have found the stamp such a bargain they've snapped up $2.3 billion worth, including $95 million since the Postal Service announced stamps are going up again.

Public Sticks with 'Forever' Stamps

Public Sticks with 'Forever' Stamps

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It's may now be viewed as snail mail, but the U.S. Postal Service has managed to hit on a winning strategy for selling stamps: Announce an increase in price, then offer a "Forever Stamp" that never goes up. Since its introduction last year, Americans have found the stamp such a bargain they've snapped up $2.3 billion worth, including $95 million since the Postal Service announced stamps are going up again.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It may now be viewed as snail mail, but the U.S. Postal Service has managed to hit on a winning strategy for selling stamps: Announce an increase in price and offer a Forever Stamp that never goes up. Since its introduction last year, Americans have found the Forever Stamp such a bargain they've snapped up $2.3 billion worth, spending $95 million just since the Postal Service announced stamps are going up again.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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