Stock Prices Fall Around the World Major U.S. stock indices started the trading day lower Monday — a lot lower. Investors reacted to the emergency sale of investment bank Bear Stearns, as well as drastic actions by the Fed to shore up confidence in financial markets. Investors around the globe were also nervous after the weekend news from Wall Street.
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Stock Prices Fall Around the World

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Stock Prices Fall Around the World

Stock Prices Fall Around the World

Stock Prices Fall Around the World

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with Asian markets nervous about Wall Street.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: You would think that investors in Asia would be accustomed by now to bad news from Wall Street, but that did not stop the panic selling today. Investors from India to Australia woke up to news of a fire sale takeover of a Wall Street investment bank.

Bear Stearns was bought out. It was supposed to be a rescue, but it looked like more grim tidings, and investors headed for the exits. Stock markets across the region fell sharply, with Hong Kong and India down nearly 5 percent. Tokyo stocks were down 4 percent.