'Gangs of New York' Robert Siegel and historian Tyler Anbinder discuss the historical accuracy of Martin Scorsese's new film Gangs of New York. Anbinber is the author of Five Points: The Nineteenth Century New York Neighborhood That Invented Tap Dance, Stole Elections and Became the World's Most Notorious Slum.
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'Gangs of New York'

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'Gangs of New York'

'Gangs of New York'

'Gangs of New York'

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Robert Siegel and historian Tyler Anbinder discuss the historical accuracy of Martin Scorsese's new film Gangs of New York. Anbinber is the author of Five Points: The Nineteenth Century New York Neighborhood That Invented Tap Dance, Stole Elections and Became the World's Most Notorious Slum.