Secret Service Agent Tells True-Life Tale of Intrigue Abraham Bolden got his start as an Illinois State trooper. A few years later, he joined the United States Secret Service. Then in 1961, a chance meeting with President John F. Kennedy changed his life forever. He talks to Farai Chideya about his new book, his life, and what he considers to be evidence suppression in the case of Kennedy's assassination.
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Secret Service Agent Tells True-Life Tale of Intrigue

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Secret Service Agent Tells True-Life Tale of Intrigue

Secret Service Agent Tells True-Life Tale of Intrigue

Secret Service Agent Tells True-Life Tale of Intrigue

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88965136/88965120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The cover of The Echo from Dealey Plaza Harmony Publishing hide caption

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Harmony Publishing

Bolden explains why he wrongfully spent six years in jail for bribery charges.

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Abraham Bolden got his start as an Illinois State trooper. A few years later, he joined the United States Secret Service. Then in 1961, a chance meeting with President John F. Kennedy changed his life forever.

In his new memoir, The Echo from Dealey Plaza, he chronicles his experiences as the nation's first African-American Secret Service agent; on-the-job discrimination; and a conviction on bribery charges.

He talks to Farai Chideya about his new book, his life, and what he considers to be evidence suppression in the case of Kennedy's assassination.

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