Beijing Outlaws Spitting Ahead of Olympics With the Summer Olympics 500 days away, officials in Beijing plan a crackdown on what city officials consider "uncivilized" habits. Beijing residents are known for spitting in public. On Wednesday, officials said they're prepared take harsh action against spitters, including fines, if public appeals don't work.
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Beijing Outlaws Spitting Ahead of Olympics

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Beijing Outlaws Spitting Ahead of Olympics

Beijing Outlaws Spitting Ahead of Olympics

Beijing Outlaws Spitting Ahead of Olympics

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With the Summer Olympics 500 days away, officials in Beijing plan a crackdown on what city officials consider "uncivilized" habits. Beijing residents are known for spitting in public. On Wednesday, officials said they're prepared take harsh action against spitters, including fines, if public appeals don't work.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Officials in Beijing are getting down to business, what, with the Olympics 500 days away. Our last word is about a crackdown on what city officials consider uncivilized habits. China sees the Olympics as a chance to show the world it's a global power. And citizens of global powers apparently don't spit.

Beijing residents are known for spitting in public. Some say it's a reaction to the city's dry and dusty air. Yesterday officials said they're prepared to take harsh action against spitters. That could mean fines if their public appeals don't work.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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