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The latest headlines.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Zimbabwe's opposition party today called a nationwide strike after the country's high court rejected an appeal for the immediate release of the presidential election results. Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai insists he won the March 29th election outright. He's accused President Robert Mugabe of holding back the results to maintain his 28-year-long grip on power.

Independent election monitors say Tsvangirai won, but not by enough to prevent a runoff. The state-run newspaper in Zimbabwe called the strike an "illegal action," and said police plan to, quote, "deal severely with anyone who breaches the law."

A day after World Bank president, Robert Zoellick, asked governments around the world to step up and help to combat the global food crisis, President Bush announced that the U.S. will make more food assistance available to countries in need. Here's NPR's Michele Keleman with more.

MICHELE KELEMAN: According to a statement from the White House, President Bush is making 200 million dollars in emergency food aid available to countries in Africa and elsewhere. The idea is to help address the rising commodity prices that have sparked protests and riots in many countries.

The U.S. Agency for International Development will distribute the food. The Bush administration also has a 350 million dollar supplemental budget request for food aid, and has asked Congress to allow it to buy more food directly from farmers in the developing world, to get supplies to people faster and to help build up local agriculture.

MARTIN: NPR's Michele Keleman. More than 400 children taken from a polygamous compound in west Texas last week have been relocated to a new shelter after a viral outbreak. Nathan Bernier of member station KUT reports from San Angelo, Texas.

NATHAN BERNIER: The 416 children taken from a ranch outside Eldorado have been housed by the state in two cramped locations in San Angelo. Debra Brown is the executive director of the Children's Advocacy Center. She's responsible for reporting on the children's conditions to a state district judge.

Ms. DEBRA BROWN (Executive Director, Children's Advocacy Center): I think they're being taken care of quite well. I think that they're scared and kind of wondering what's going on.

BERNIER: Dr. Sandra Guerra-Cantu, with the state of Texas, says they're dealing with about 20 cases of chicken pox.

Dr. SANDRA GUERRA-CANTU (Public Health Regional Medical Director, Texas Department of State Health Services): We are still in the incubation period and so there is the potential that we may still have additional cases.

BERNIER: On Monday, the state moved the children to a local concert stadium with a 5,00-seat capacity. The children will stay there at least until a custody hearing on Thursday.

MARTIN: Nathan Bernier of member station KUT reporting. And are you headed south of the border? The U.S. State Department wants you to be careful where you go in Mexico. They've issued a new travel warning for Americans thinking about visiting certain areas, including Tijuana and Juarez.

They aren't telling people not to visit, just warning them of increased drug violence and kidnapping. Drug cartels are active in those zones, and violence has increased recently. That's the news, and it is always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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