Stem Cells: A Tale of Two Scientists In the last of three reports on the contrast between embryonic stem-cell research in Britain and the United States, NPR's Joe Palca talks to a British scientist who does research in Madison, Wis., and an American scientist who does research in Cambridge, England. The Brit, Clive Svendsen, says he likes the energetic, can-do attitude in America and predicts that American practicality and private funding will offset the uncertainties surrounding embryonic stem cell research in the United States. The Yank, Roger Pedersen, was attracted to Cambridge by Britain's government funding and broad public support for medical research on human embryos. It's research that might lead to treatments for diseases such as Parkinson's and diabetes.
NPR logo Stem Cells: A Tale of Two Scientists

Stem Cells: A Tale of Two Scientists

In the last of three reports on the contrast between embryonic stem-cell research in Britain and the United States, NPR's Joe Palca talks to a British scientist who does research in Madison, Wis., and an American scientist who does research in Cambridge, England. The Brit, Clive Svendsen, says he likes the energetic, can-do attitude in America and predicts that American practicality and private funding will offset the uncertainties surrounding embryonic stem cell research in the United States. The Yank, Roger Pedersen, was attracted to Cambridge by Britain's government funding and broad public support for medical research on human embryos. It's research that might lead to treatments for diseases such as Parkinson's and diabetes.

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