A Vote for the 'Right to Tumble Dry' Movement Environmentalists want people to curb their use of tumble dryers. But some refuse to let go of their dryer sheets. Essayist Diane Roberts says a tumble dryer is "an instrument of moral rectitude," and helps keep her neighborhood harmonic because no one knows who wears a thong.
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A Vote for the 'Right to Tumble Dry' Movement

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A Vote for the 'Right to Tumble Dry' Movement

A Vote for the 'Right to Tumble Dry' Movement

A Vote for the 'Right to Tumble Dry' Movement

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89979943/89979973" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Environmentalists want people to curb their use of tumble dryers. But some refuse to let go of their dryer sheets. Can't it be argued that a tumble dryer is "an instrument of moral rectitude" that helps keep a neighborhood harmonic? After all, who really wants to know which neighbor wears a thong?