Letters: Rev. Wright; Farming Family Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read listeners' responses to Monday's program, including comments about NPR's coverage of remarks by Barack Obama's former pastor, Jeremiah Wright. There's also reaction to a story about a family farming corn in central Iowa.
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Letters: Rev. Wright; Farming Family

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Letters: Rev. Wright; Farming Family

Letters: Rev. Wright; Farming Family

Letters: Rev. Wright; Farming Family

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Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read listeners' responses to Monday's program, including comments about NPR's coverage of remarks by Barack Obama's former pastor, Jeremiah Wright. There's also reaction to a story about a family farming corn in central Iowa.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Now, some of your comments on yesterday's program.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

We got about three dozen messages responding to our coverage of Reverend Jeremiah Wright. Yesterday, Barack Obama's former pastor answered questions at the National Press Club; on Sunday, he spoke to the NAACP; and on Friday, PBS aired an interview with him. For analysis of Wright's comments, I spoke with two Democratic congressmen, one who backs Obama and another who supports Hillary Clinton.

SIEGEL: The pastor's positions surprised me greatly, writes Peter Wolman(ph) of Shavertown, Pennsylvania. He continues, when Wright dismisses someone for not having heard one of his sermons, I note, do I need to listen to the full content of Klansman David Duke's commentary to understand its context? My issue is not with what has been reported about his sermons, but with him being dismissive of those who question his position.

BLOCK: And we heard this sentiment from a lot of listeners. You're wasting too much time dissecting and parsing this preacher's soundbites, that's from Jim McNickel(ph). He goes on, this kind of dialogue becomes a disservice to your listeners and reeks of the pandering that lesser talk radio shows would engage in. We are in dire need of discussions about the issues pressing upon every common American no matter what race or religious creed, not a rehashing of old news.

SIEGEL: Finally, yesterday, we aired the first in a series of stories, following one farming family in Ankeny, Iowa. We'll be checking in with the Griffieons each season as they manage more than 1,100 acres of corn and soybeans as well as their livestock. For now, times are good. Thanks to a high demand for corn and ethanol made from corn.

BLOCK: I was just listening to the story you all had on about an Iowa farmer raising corn.

SIEGEL: This e-mail comes from Daniel Dryer(ph) about Corpus Christi, Texas.

BLOCK: He goes on, I just think there's another side to the ethanol corn story. The high price does not only affect farmers selling corn but also farmers buying corn seed to plant. If a farmer can't afford to buy corn seed, then the high selling prices aren't worth anything. It's always nice to hear good things about what is happening, but most happenings in the world must be looked at in stereo.

SIEGEL: Well, for what it's worth, our story was in stereo. But still, we understand what you mean. Keep those comments coming at npr.org/contact.

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