Examining Pitfalls of Indiana's Voter ID Law The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last week that an Indiana law requiring voters to show photo ID is constitutional. Sunday Soapbox vlogger Jacob Soboroff explores the issue, visiting an election law expert and hopping on a bus to time how long it takes to get a photo ID if you don't already have one.
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Examining Pitfalls of Indiana's Voter ID Law

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Examining Pitfalls of Indiana's Voter ID Law

Examining Pitfalls of Indiana's Voter ID Law

Examining Pitfalls of Indiana's Voter ID Law

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90167609/90167588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last week that an Indiana law requiring voters to show photo ID is constitutional. Sunday Soapbox vlogger Jacob Soboroff explores the issue, visiting an election law expert and hopping on a bus to time how long it takes to get a photo ID if you don't already have one.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

This past week the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that an Indiana law requiring voters to show photo ID is Constitutional. So, we asked our Sunday Soapbox blogger, Jacob Soboroff, to explore the issue. He went to Loyola Law School in Los Angeles to talk to election law expert Rick Hasen. Here's an excerpt from his vlog.

JACOB SOBOROFF: Hasen said we're seeing election administration and election laws being determined more and more by party affiliation throughout the United States. Without true bipartisan support for reforming our thousands upon thousands of election jurisdictions nationwide, who loses? The voters.

Professor RICHARD HASEN (Law, Loyola Law School, Election Law Expert): My proposal is that the government goes out and affirmatively registers everybody who wants to be registered. And, of course, you have an objection to being registered, you don't have to be registered. But the government goes out proactively, universal voter registration. When people are graduating high school, they get registered to vote, they get a national voter ID card. When they move, that follows with them. The voter ID card has a thumbprint on it, and so if you ever forget your card, as long as you don't forget your thumb, you can vote.

HANSEN: That was Loyola Law School Professor Rick Hasen.

Unidentified Woman: Civic Center...

HANSEN: Jacob Soboroff then hops on a bus to time how long it would take someone to get a photo ID to vote.

SOBOROFF: I'm going to start my stopwatch here on my iPhone to see how long it actually might take and how inconvenient it might be.

HANSEN: To see how long it took Jacob Soboroff to try to get a photo ID, go to out (unintelligible) blog, NPR.org/SundaySoapbox.

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