National Geographic's 'Greendex' Ranks U.S. Last Even using energy-saving light bulbs, driving hybrid cars and buying organic, Americans are in last place when it comes to being environmentally friendly. So finds National Geographic's first "Greendex," which polled people in 14 countries. Brazil and India share the top slot.
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National Geographic's 'Greendex' Ranks U.S. Last

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National Geographic's 'Greendex' Ranks U.S. Last

National Geographic's 'Greendex' Ranks U.S. Last

National Geographic's 'Greendex' Ranks U.S. Last

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90268561/90268622" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Even using energy-saving light bulbs, driving hybrid cars and buying organic, Americans are in last place when it comes to being environmentally friendly. So finds National Geographic's first "Greendex," which polled people in 14 countries. Brazil and India share the top slot.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

You have the energy-saving light bulbs, the hybrid car, you buy organic, but Americans are still very low on the list when it comes to being environmentally friendly - so finds National Geographic's first Greendex. It polled thousands of people in 14 countries, and the U.S. came in dead last in housing and transportation. Brazil and India share the top spot, mostly because they live in small homes that don't use heat or air conditioning.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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