Moms, Kids Play Role in Campaign Ads We play clips from recent presidential campaign ads, including ads featuring Sen. John McCain's 96-year-old mother; Chelsea Clinton talking about mom, Hillary; and kids urging their mothers to vote for Sen. Barack Obama.
NPR logo

Moms, Kids Play Role in Campaign Ads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90354932/90354905" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Moms, Kids Play Role in Campaign Ads

Moms, Kids Play Role in Campaign Ads

Moms, Kids Play Role in Campaign Ads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90354932/90354905" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

We play clips from recent presidential campaign ads, including ads featuring Sen. John McCain's 96-year-old mother; Chelsea Clinton talking about mom, Hillary; and kids urging their mothers to vote for Sen. Barack Obama.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

And speaking of Mother's Day, we can't resist playing clips from recent presidential campaign ads. This one features Senator John McCain's 96-year-old mother, Roberta McCain.

(Soundbite of advertisement)

Ms. ROBERTA MCCAIN (Mother of Senator John McCain): He was the sweetest, nicest child I've ever known. I think he'll make a wonderful president. Well, he's not perfect. Did I say that?

Senator JOHN MCCAIN (Republican, Arizona, Presumed Presidential Nominee): He doesn't pay enough attention to his mother, I think, maybe.

Ms. MCCAIN: No, I'm happy with...

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. MCCAIN: ...I have no complaints.

Sen. MCCAIN: I'm John McCain and I approve this message - and my mom does too.

HANSEN: That was Senator John McCain along with his mother Roberta McCain. You can watch that video, and this one from Chelsea Clinton, at our election blog at NPR.org/SundaySoapbox.

(Soundbite of advertisement)

Ms. CHELSEA CLINTON (Daughter of President Bill Clinton and Senator Hillary Clinton): I'd like to tell you about my mom. Yes, she's running for president, but she's always done a lot of running. She'd run straight home from work to ensure we had dinner together every night and to help me with my homework. She'd run to school if I were sick and needed to be home with my mom taking care of me...

HANSEN: And there's one more - a video of kids urging their moms to vote for Senator Barack Obama.

(Soundbite of advertisement)

Unidentified Man #1: He believes in me.

Unidentified Man #2: Can you imagine what would happen if he were president?

Unidentified Man #1: This election is really important.

Unidentified Man #2: It's like you've always taught me. We shouldn't treat people differently because they look different. Because really we're all the same, we're all the same.

Unidentified Man #1: We need to stop fighting with each other if we were to get anything done.

Unidentified Man #2: Mom, I can't vote in this election but you can. Our moment for change has come.

Unidentified Man #1: Our time is now.

Unidentified Man #2: Mom, will you please vote for Obama, ma?

(Soundbite of music)

HANSEN: You're listening to NPR News.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.