Military Wives Fight Army to Help Husbands Spouses of troops suffering from postwar mental trauma have made it their mission to force the military to give soldiers the treatment they need. Military wives — traditionally known as "the silent ranks" — have transformed into unexpected activists.
NPR logo

Military Wives Fight Army to Help Husbands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90378222/90534226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Military Wives Fight Army to Help Husbands

Military Wives Fight Army to Help Husbands

Military Wives Fight Army to Help Husbands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90378222/90534226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tammie LeCompte meticulously filed every Army document about Ryan LeCompte in chronological order in binders. Senate aides say these bulging binders helped convince them that Army officials were mistreating her husband. Daniel Zwerdling/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

Tammie LeCompte meticulously filed every Army document about Ryan LeCompte in chronological order in binders. Senate aides say these bulging binders helped convince them that Army officials were mistreating her husband.

Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

Read More on Fort Carson

By the time Ryan LeCompte was transferred to Walter Reed Army Hospital in late 2007, he was hardly walking or talking — or even eating on his own. He spent most of his time slumped, staring at the floor. Daniel Zwerdling/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

By the time Ryan LeCompte was transferred to Walter Reed Army Hospital in late 2007, he was hardly walking or talking — or even eating on his own. He spent most of his time slumped, staring at the floor.

Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

James Pitchford, aide to Sen. Christopher Bond (R-MO), is so outraged at how Fort Carson treated Ryan LeCompte that he made a rare exception to an unwritten rule on Capitol Hill that staff members never speak to the media, except anonymously "on background." Daniel Zwerdling/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

James Pitchford, aide to Sen. Christopher Bond (R-MO), is so outraged at how Fort Carson treated Ryan LeCompte that he made a rare exception to an unwritten rule on Capitol Hill that staff members never speak to the media, except anonymously "on background."

Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

Document: Walter Reed Doctor