The Hot New Trend: Manure Chemical fertilizer prices have tripled in the last year, so farmers are returning to the old ways. Some are finding they can make more money using their beef cattle to produce manure than they'd make on the meat.
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The Hot New Trend: Manure

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The Hot New Trend: Manure

The Hot New Trend: Manure

The Hot New Trend: Manure

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Chemical fertilizer has tripled in price in the past year. And farmers are returning to the old ways: spreading manure on their fields instead of treating it as a worthless byproduct.

Some farmers are finding they can make more profit using their beef cattle to produce manure than they'd make on their meat; others are looking for new ways to maximize the "output" of their livestock, including investing in expensive equipment to capture methane in a chicken house.

Meanwhile, the growing ranks of organic produce farmers are suddenly finding that their manure suppliers will no longer supply them.

New Hampshire Public Radio's Dan Gorenstein reports.