Letters: Bush at Furman, Witty Women Readers write in about President Bush's scheduled commencement address at Furman University and wonder why a story on clever one-liners in politics didn't feature more women.
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Letters: Bush at Furman, Witty Women

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Letters: Bush at Furman, Witty Women

Letters: Bush at Furman, Witty Women

Letters: Bush at Furman, Witty Women

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Readers write in about President Bush's scheduled commencement address at Furman University and wonder why a story on clever one-liners in politics didn't feature more women.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And it's time for your comments.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Many of you wrote about our story on Furman University in South Carolina and the protest planned when President Bush gives the commencement address there later this month. Furman student Susan Head said our story made it seem like only professors opposed the president's visit. She said students also signed a petition objecting to the speech. She writes, liberals may be in the minority here, but we are not silent. And a different take from Laura Jack of Kingsport, Tennessee…

Ms. LAURA JACK (NPR Listener, Kingsport, Tennessee): The thing I noticed in this program was one professor's ridiculous assertion that listening to the president implied that she condoned his policies. Respectful - or at least silent - listening is not and never has been an indicator of support or agreement. Respectful listening is instead a sign of maturity and a willingness to learn.

MONTAGNE: And this clarification on that story we aired when we said the president was invited to speak at Furman. University administrators explain the offer was initiated by South Carolina's Republican governor.

We also reported that the president will speak at the Air Force Academy, but we mistakenly said cadets, quote, "take an oath to support the commander-in-chief." Members of the military wrote to point out that their oath only calls for them to obey the president, not support him.

And a final correction - yesterday, in a report on investigators digging for hidden graves at Charles Manson's last hideout, we gave the wrong location for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It's not in Knoxville, Tennessee. It's in - surprise - Oak Ridge.

Now for your response to our questions from last week's listener, Peaches Henry of Waco, Texas. She heard my interview about clever one-liners in politics and asked why we didn't include more witty women. You sent your best quotes. The winner, hands down: a foot, a silver foot. That's reference to the quip by late Texas Governor Ann Richards that a certain former president was born with a silver foot in his mouth.

If you have a comment - witty, wise, whatever - send it our way. Go to npr.org and click on Contact Us.

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